At Globant, we believe that unlimited voices bring unlimited power. Every day, and even more during this LGBTQIA+ pride month, we are promoting respect, empathy, and elevation for diverse points of view, beliefs, and passions. That’s why, for this Cover Story, we asked 6 Glober’s to raise their voices so everyone can know their stories. 

1. What is belonging to the LGBTQIA+ community for you? And what space did you find at Globant?

Camren Daly


Belonging to the LGBTQIA+ community has meant understanding a part of myself through the context of those that share my experiences. Also being part of a group that embodies the efforts of generations of LGBTQIA+ folx before me. When I first came out, my group of queer friends gave me a safe place in a time when I was trying to figure out who ‘I’ was. They taught me the language of love and acceptance in a world where I wasn’t sure I would find it. And, most of all, being part of this community has meant being able to provide all of this to others as they find themselves on their own LGBTQIA+ journeys.

At Globant, I have always found acceptance. Also, a genuine desire to create an inclusive and progressive workplace that is responsive to the needs of LGBTQIA+ folx. Because of this, communities that did not exist before now do. And because of this, the voices of members of this community can be heard even in those places where being LGBTQIA+ may not be safe.

Daniel Aragon 


Throughout my life, being part of the LGBTQIA+ community has taken on several meanings. In my youth, it meant being able to put how I felt into words. Discovering the value of being visible in a world that often forgot about us or did not take us into account. Being part of the community also meant not being alone. Not being the only one who didn’t fit into society’s template.

It has also meant learning a lot and unlearning even more. Being part of the community has put me in positions where I had to rethink the way I see the world. It has made me more sensitive to other problems. And in general, it has made me a person that’s more in touch with the world.

When I arrived at Globant I found a large group dedicated to generate Diversity and Inclusion initiatives. It was the first time I was part of a community at work and my first job where such a community even existed. It was the best place for me. By being part of this community I have been able to meet many valuable people who have inspired me to give my identity a more important role in my life.

Jorge Frias

I don’t like to be labeled or classified within a community. This makes a paradigm that separates us (LGBTQIA+) from others. I think that we are the same as anyone else who loves and feels. I have learned that my happiness comes from the people who I love, who are above all prejudiced opinions. So, I take care of the environment where I’m living, the friends I choose, and the family who share my good memories, along with the bad ones.

Here at Globant Peru, it’s been a progressive learning process. Although many people are LGBTQIA+ there is still a fear of being labeled by others. I consider one of the Globant’s strongest moments in changing the company’s mindsets to be when they added “Inclusive” to Globant values. It promoted people to be more tolerant and to accept us as part of a plural coexistence. 

2. What does it mean to you to celebrate Pride in June?

Lucas Rolon 

It’s a month where we celebrate the fight, and the rights won, and we take inventory on the rights we still need to obtain. Yes, there are many rights we still need to obtain.

Aleja Restrepo

The meaning that I give to this celebration is visibility. Beyond exposing ourselves to the world, it is really about recognizing ourselves and being recognized; becoming visible without the fear of being judged, it is marching towards having a life free of rejection. It is a call to the world to tell them that we want to love whomever we decide to love.

Alexa Altez

Really, in Uruguay, it is celebrated in September and not in June. But in September, it makes me super special mainly for a reason, that month, specifically the day of the diversity march, it was when I got married with my current partner! So I not only celebrate being who I really am, but I also celebrate my anniversary.

3. What makes you proud? 

Lucas Rolón

Being able to transform all the hate and violence that I received during a great part of my life for being part of the LGBTQIA+ community, into an active militancy.

Camren Daly

I’m proud that I work at a company that values diversity. A company that is willing to have conversations that are uncomfortable; and endeavors to create a safe place where people can find connection and community even when the society around them does not.

Daniel Aragon

Even though there is still a long way to go, it makes me proud to see all that we have achieved in terms of equality, diversity, and inclusion. It fills me with pride to witness the most genuine and honest version of those who have lost their fear of being who they are. The expressions of love, so plural and beautiful, also fill me with pride.

Aleja Restrepo

I am proud of who I am today, of deciding to live in love without fear and prejudice.

Jorge Frias

That I have corrected many mistakes from my past. To stand up to hard knocks, to never give up, to pursue my dreams, and achieve them. But most importantly: I have learned to accept myself and value my family.

Alexa Altez

I always received comments about my style (which I understand were not done with bad intentions, but only ignorance/fear):”With that long hair you won’t get a job” or “ You expect to be taken seriously dressing like that?” But, I am very proud. I managed to progress and create my life, I made many friends, I was able to study what I like and work in that field and it’s going well. I am in a beautiful relationship, I get along with my family, I managed to become independent and have so many things and all this, by being what I really am and not what i was supposed to “be”.

4. What would you like to share with the Globers? 

Lucas Rolon

I would like to tell every glober that is part of the LGBTQIA+ community, that you are not alone. Your identity is valid and nothing that others say can deny that. If you have no one to talk to, if you still can’t tell anyone about your sexual/gender identity and you need to chat, I am here. 

I would also like to tell every glober that is NOT part of the  LGBTQIA+ community that it is okay to have prejudices and do not understand realities outside yours; but it’s up to you to break out of those prejudices to try to understand us. Our identities are NOT A CHOICE and it is not your job to judge us. Stop the homolesbotrans-hate jokes, stop the painful comments, stop speaking for us, stop speaking without knowledge. The time to change is now.

Daniel Aragon

Mexico’s Globant LGBTQIA+ community was started by a few people last year, including Santiago San Martin (Mexico’s Country Manager), and has been going strong ever since. It’s been an amazing ride and we’re hoping we can keep doing a lot more for all Globers this year. The community advocates for Globant’s inclusive and diverse culture. As part of our efforts to promote these values, we create and support multiple projects. 

That’s why we constantly recruit volunteers to help us sustain these projects. I would love to invite anyone who’s interested in these kinds of activities to reach out, organize, and participate in initiatives such as these ones. Happy pride month!

Aleja Restrepo

I want to leave a little reflection that says: “It is brave to exceed the limits that we or the world have set for us.” Put aside those prejudices that time imposes on us because, if we observe, a child is not born with prejudices, and to focus on the subject, for a child there is only love. The invitation then is that we remember to be like them. That we live from love, from respect, without pointing and judging, because love is love after all.

Jorge Frias

Let them lose their fear, that we’re from another planet. The only thing we want is to live our happiness, with no intention of hurting others. That they learn to celebrate our achievements with us. That we feel free to share what and who makes us happy. I know that would help us strengthen relationships and be a true family. Put your strict beliefs aside and learn to be genuinely happy. People fear what they don’t know.

Alexa Altez

It’s true that self-effort achieves many things, but by itself, it is very difficult. It can go against the world and, after all, we live in a society and we need each other. Where am I going with this? As a society, we have the responsibility not to exclude people. It is not necessary for them to go on marches to raise flags, small gestures in daily life can help: using the correct pronoun with a transgender person for example (among many other things). Small gestures like that can brighten someone’s day and help them continue struggling and striving. A person who strives can walk on his own, but he needs a floor that is often created by those that surround us. 

Through these six testimonials from Camren (US), Daniel (Mexico), Jorge (Peru), Lucas (Argentina), Alexa (Uruguay), and Aleja (Colombia) we were able to meet different perspectives to reflect on Pride Month. Certainly much remains to be built to further promote information, tolerance, respect, and inclusion.

At Globant we seek to guarantee an inclusive environment throughout the world, understanding that differences enrich us, complement us, and drive innovation and creativity. To all of our Globers, followers, and community we say: be yourself, show yourselves as genuine, faithful to your history, and transform any pain into an opportunity to create something positive. Let’s unite and celebrate our differences, ensuring that everyone is treated with dignity and respect.

Be Yourself

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